Crouching Tiger Two, Hidden Dragon Zero

I have not been looking forward to this for quite some time. The Weinstein Company’s inexplicable campaign to marginalize Asian action films, and minimize its effect on American cinema, has been going on for decades now (see my Daily Grindhouse op-ed one post away on this site). Even as far as two years ago I
More —

A History of Disrespect

In “honor” of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny, I have been re-linking to my now somewhat (in)famous editorial for Daily Grindhouse about The Weinstein Company’s campaign to marginalize and minimize Asian action cinema … only to find that the Daily Grindhouse site is M.I.A. … maybe temporarily, maybe forever. In any case, thought
More —

Martial Arts in Media Summer 2015

So there I am, clutching a box of chocolate-covered peanuts, feeling like a kid at a Saturday matinee, waiting for Mission Impossible Rogue Nation to whisk me away for a globe-hopping, action-packed joyride — when, right there on the big, modified Imax screen, comes the production company title cards. Sure, there was J.J. Abrams’ Bad
More —

Martial Arts in Media Summer 2014

Notice anything different about the headline? Yes, the day has finally arrived. Although I have maintained this monthly column for Inside Kung-Fu magazine and on this site for decades, the martial art movie is in such dire straits — from Chinese Government interference to American studio sabotage, as well as the general creeping generic action
More —

2013’s 5 Best (& 10 Worst) Film Fights

Yes, yes, I could’ve done my somewhat annual list of the top and bottom TV shows and films of the year, but everybody does that. So I figured, why not do a list where my so-called “area of expertise” would have some sway? So here, then, in alphabetical order, is my p.o.v. on what made,
More —

Martial Arts in Media 5/13

Nowhere is the Chinese Government’s portentous effect on its artists more apparent than in the “Chinese cut” of Iron Man 3. In order to appease the gatekeepers who held the permission for the film to be shown in China, somebody had to create less than five minutes of China-centric footage, featuring Wang Xueqi (Reign of
More —

Martial Arts in Media 10/12

Studio execs like to pretend that quality has nothing to do with it. As long as films have existed, there’s always been a cinematic cadre of insecure people who like to make their estimations of success without considering the quality of the films presented. Kung fu films are no different … and yet they are.
More —

Martial Arts in Media 12/11

I’ve been busy. You know, what with making lists, checking ‘em twice, etc. So, although there’re a fistful of new kung fu and kung fu related films out on DVD, (including one I’m in!) I won’t be able to get to them until 2012 (yes, that’s how busy I am finding out who’s naughty or
More —

True-ish Legend

True Legend is not brilliant, but it is beautiful. For kung fu film novices, it’ll be an eyeful, but for veteran enthusiasts it’s a fascinating distillation of director/choreographer Yuen Wo-ping’s talents – both for good and ill. Remember, this is the man best known in America for choreographing The Matrix movies, but best known in
More —

36th Chamber 11/10

36TH CHAMBER by Ric Meyers RIC REPORTS DATELINE LOS ANGELES — Indomina Releasing, a new feature film distributor, has gone shopping and hit pay dirt. Recently I let you know that they have the North American rights for True Legend — Yuen Wo-ping’s epic, kung-fu-filled, retelling of the Beggar Su legend – but now they
More —