Martial Arts in Media Winter 2016

American author Thomas Wolfe once wrote a book called You Can’t Go Home Again – a phrase that, over the years, has come to signify that attempting to recapture the joys of one’s youth is folly. In fact, on the Wikipedia page it flatly states “attempts to relive youthful memories will always fail.” Well, if
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Martial Arts in Media Autumn 2015

Well, that’s that. A combination of rampant bootlegging and a paucity of product has done in the last store in New York City’s Chinatown that still sold actual, authentic, legal DVDs and VCDs. Rest in peace P Music Video Corp. Thanks for your honesty, patience, and dedication. Rest assured, however, if the store had been
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Martial Arts in Media 5/14

The cinemas in China continue to multiply, and the audience continues to grow, but the films that are being fed to them are like meat to lions. If they’re hungry, they’ll devour anything thrown at them and roar for more – no matter how tough the gristle. Producers and studios don’t mind. “Look how successful
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Martial Arts in Media 10/12

Studio execs like to pretend that quality has nothing to do with it. As long as films have existed, there’s always been a cinematic cadre of insecure people who like to make their estimations of success without considering the quality of the films presented. Kung fu films are no different … and yet they are.
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Martial Arts in Media 9/12

Rarely has the title of this column been more accurate. When I started this decades ago for Inside Kung Fu magazine, it was called Martial Arts in Movies, with my intention to shorten it to the apt moniker of M.A.I.M. When our illustrious editor Dave Cater nixed that contraction, the column rolled merrily along until
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Martial Arts in Media 5/12

Things are happening. Not now. But they’re happening. As the Chinese movie audience swells, and mainland cinemas are being erected almost as fast as the populace can buy cars to drive to them, more locally-grow films are being demanded to fill the nationalist need. And, of course, the one thing the Chinese do better than
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