A History of Disrespect

In “honor” of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny, I have been re-linking to my now somewhat (in)famous editorial for Daily Grindhouse about The Weinstein Company’s campaign to marginalize and minimize Asian action cinema … only to find that the Daily Grindhouse site is M.I.A. … maybe temporarily, maybe forever. In any case, thought
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Martial Arts in Media Spring 2015

Any filmmaker who prize their creative freedom may never make another film in China, unless they need money or things change. At the moment all Chinese filmmakers (Hong Kong included/especially) have to brave the gauntlet of Governmental review at the start and end of production (at the very least). Even for those willing and able
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Martial Arts in Media 1/14

For the first time since China took over Hong Kong in 1997, the future looks interesting (at the least) and hopeful (at the most) for kung fu film fans. To put that contention in perspective, The Hollywood Reporter recently cited Chinese cinema’s growing concern about international disparities. “While China’s domestic box office in 2012 was
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Martial Arts in Media 11/13

Oh brother. First, I’m sorry this column is so late in the month, and second, sorry it’s going to be so short. Anyone who knows me probably understands at least one of the reasons why this is such a busy time of the year for me (hint: ho ho ho, second hint: santaconfidential.com). But also,
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New York Asian Film Fest Everyone?

For the last ten years, at around this time, the place to be was at the New York Asian Film Festival. Now, in its eleventh year, the place to be is still the New York Asian Film Festival, at its super plush and cuddly home in the Walter Reade Theater at Lincoln Center and the
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Martial Arts in Media 1/12

Ok, this is beginning to depress me. First, there was the realization that there was not a single great kung fu movie last year. Now this. It’s not so much that the films below were disappointing, but that they were so slapdash – especially from a storytelling standpoint. Once upon a time, Hong Kong-slash-Chinese cinema
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MAIM 8/11

Missed MAIM 7/11 (Hey Ric, this wouldn’t have happened if Inside Kung Fu was still publishing! Yeah, but it’s not. Nyah). Busy, what with San Diego Comic Con, the premiere of my new documentary Films of Fury: The Kung Fu Movie Movie, and LA promotion of my two new books (what, you still harping on
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