A History of Disrespect

In “honor” of Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny, I have been re-linking to my now somewhat (in)famous editorial for Daily Grindhouse about The Weinstein Company’s campaign to marginalize and minimize Asian action cinema … only to find that the Daily Grindhouse site is M.I.A. … maybe temporarily, maybe forever. In any case, thought
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Martial Arts in Media Autumn 2015

Well, that’s that. A combination of rampant bootlegging and a paucity of product has done in the last store in New York City’s Chinatown that still sold actual, authentic, legal DVDs and VCDs. Rest in peace P Music Video Corp. Thanks for your honesty, patience, and dedication. Rest assured, however, if the store had been
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Martial Arts in Media Spring 2015

Any filmmaker who prize their creative freedom may never make another film in China, unless they need money or things change. At the moment all Chinese filmmakers (Hong Kong included/especially) have to brave the gauntlet of Governmental review at the start and end of production (at the very least). Even for those willing and able
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Martial Arts in Media 8/13

As studios on each side of the oceans scramble to play nice-nice so they can get a piece of China’s burgeoning movie finances and audiences, the results can be both hopeful and crest-falling. Squarely in the latter category is Switch, writer/director Jay Sun’s magnificent mess, seemingly created to bite off hunks of Roger Moore’s James
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Jackie & Me

It’s time I face it. Jackie Chan’s my martial art movie muse. His Drunken Monkey in a Tiger’s Eye (Drunken Master, 1978) was the film that inspired me to write my first martial art movie book (which was published in the early 1980’s). I had already seen Five Fingers of Death and Enter the Dragon,
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Martial Arts in Media 2/13

Sigh. Pardon me for sighing. It’s just that when old film friends take the easy route, or create a great set-up then present a “just kidding” pay-off, it’s hard for me not to sigh. Sigh. After extensive consideration, let me say this. If you discovered and followed Jackie Chan after 1995’s Rumble in the Bronx
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Ric & Infamous 9/9

The hope never dies because we all know how talented Jackie Chan is. But with each successive film, the disappointment grows … because we all know how talented Jackie Chan is. I, for one, hit the fast forward button and take what pleasures I can from his increasingly defuse, and obtuse, filmography, all the while
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36th Chamber 2/09

Here we are, the third installment of Inside Kung-Fu’s new Entertainment Section — named in honor of Liu Chia-liang’s classic 36th Chamber of Shaolin — where, like “Master Killer” San-te before me, I try to bring kung-fu out from behind exclusive walls to the wild, weird world. RIC’S REPORTS Dateline America: The buzz is growing,
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